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Immortality as Defined by Jae Rhim Lee

By fostering the decomposition of her future corpse, Jae Rhim Lee makes certain she will make a beneficial material contribution to  ‘earth’ (soil) that supports life on ‘Earth’ (planet). The prodigious transformation of inert substances into living matter occurs within the narrow zone where the bottom layer of sky and the top layer of our planet intersect. It is precisely the zone where burial is located.

These contrasting districts opeate on complementary but opposing power sources. The energy that drives the above ground food web issues from the sun, while the energy that propels the soil food web emits from decaying organic matter. Thus photosynthesis and detritus are functionally related.  When these energy sources are synchronized, the bacteria and fungi underground conduct the heavy work of nourishing above ground populations of all kinds. This miraculous assemblage ultimately accounts for every living entity that ever existed on our special planet.

 

Monsanto Loses!

Monsanto GMOs Defeated by Oregon Organic Farmers as Federal Judge Upholds Seed Ban. June 1st, 2015

Beyond congratulating the organic farmers in Oregon for this triumphant victory, this headline may be a game-changer for the GMO industry as a whole. As Steven Rosenfeld reports on   AlterNet:

A coalition of Oregon organic farmers has beaten Monsanto—the corporate agriculture giant—in a landmark federal lawsuit that will make national waves by the way that their rural county banned the use of genetically modified seeds.

The legal challenge brought by commercial farmers who use Monsanto’s genetically modified alfalfa seeds was challenged by the non-organic farmers.Technically, the $350,000 fine is not a lot of money for a major corporate entity. In the fall of 2014, Montano posted total sales of $15.86 billion. At the same time Monsanto reported that the company lost $156 million in that quarter, presumably, one reason is that it spent a significant amount of money to defend the use of GMOs and destroy efforts to require labelling of GMO products. 

Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/1942875/monsanto-loses-will-pay-350k-to-settle-more-gm-wheat-lawsuits/#34c7vD8J7rE0fdHC.99
 
 

 

Bigger. Faster, Stronger. Further. Bolder.

An all-consuming self-interest is not unique to the human species; it is a biological imperative shared by humans, lions, dandelions, and all other forms of life. However, humanity’s self-interest violates biology’s checks and balances whenever we exploit our unique and ever-increasing ability to exceed our biological imperatives. This story begins approximately 12,000 years ago when humans first developed agriculture, cities, architecture, labor specialization, bread baking, beer brewing, personal property, slavery, governance, trade, barter, war, and more. Since then, interactions with the physical environment have been heading, at an ever-accelerating rate, toward ever bigger, faster, stronger, further, and bolder interfaces.

If success of a species is measured in terms of control over conditions of the environment to secure our needs, we are an extremely successful species. But if disruptions to the lithosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere are taken into consideration, humanity’s controlling activities resemble hubris more than success. The current environmental movement is founded   on the belief that responsibility for the well-being of the non-living environment, dissimilar species, and less fortunate humans is a corollary to the expansion of our powers.

It’s Not Natural: The Triumph of the Techno

When a polar standing on a chunk of ice floats past an island of heaped e-waste, the scene is set for the conflict between the cost to animals of humanity’s fetishistic allure for techno-updates.

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Diversity Seen and Heard

Bernie Krause and Nicole Fournier both derive their aesthetic formulations from actual ecosystem diversity.
Fournier’s diversity encompasses a broad range of botanical species – edible, medicinal, exotic, ordinary, plain, cultivated, wild, woody, succulent, etc. She presents these species of plants as a glorious smorgasbord of temptations to sustain and delight multiple species of wildlife and humans. 

Krause also revels in the abundance of natural systems, which he documents and measures through audio recordings of wild places that he has been collecting for several decades, in locations
around the globe. Krause is a soundscape ecologist who combines music and scientific research, attempting to ascertain the health of ecosystems through acoustics. He discovered, that the healthiest and most undisturbed environments have the most acoustic diversity. This is measured in terms of the range of biophany (sounds created by living creatures) and sounds of geophany (sounds created by the physical environment, such as water or wind). The Krause Natural Soundscape Collection consists of more than 4,500 hours of recordings of over 15,000 marine and terrestrial species.  Krause’s recordings of pristine sound environments are commissioned as works of art and as science.  He has produced fifty field recording albums from the world’s rare habitats. Sadly, over half of these habitats are now either diminished or silent.

Composting Human Corpses!

Nervous giggles or stunned silence – these are the two typical responses to my descriptions of Jae Rhim Lee’s Decompiculture Burial Suit. She designed it to accelerate the decomposition of her corpse after she dies, and to decontaminate her remains if her body has accumulated toxins from pharmaceuticals, processed foods, cosmetics, or exposure to environmental contaminants while she was alive. But a recent article in the NY Times reports on a burial system that may be even more extreme in its commitment to replenishing the environment.

Katrina Spade, a 37-year-old Seattle architect is designing a human composting facility. There is no scientific reason why human beings cannot be composted. Farmers regularly compost the bodies of dead livestock, while some state transportation departments compost roadkill.  Spade comments, “Composting makes people think of banana peels and coffee grounds,” Ms. Spade said. But “our bodies have nutrients. What if we could grow new life after we’ve died?”

Spade---Urban-Death-ProjectgUrban Death Project

WATER: Cause for Grieving

The current perspective more than justifies the somber journey of grief and yearning that Steiner and Lenzlinger beckoned museum-goers to undertake in 2009. The message of alarm conveyed by “Pipe Dreams: The Water Hole” becomes more urgent with each passing year. The 2015 World Water Development Report issued by the UN warned that by 2030, the world would face a 40 percent water deficit if the “business as usual” climate prevails.

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A PopUP Forest in Manhattan!!??

There might be two artist-initiated forests in Manhattan, but they could not be more different in terms of their concepts and methods.

Alan Sonfist’s Time Landscape provides an opportunity for native plant and tree specimens to evolve without human interference in perpetuity. In contrast, if Marielle Anzelone fulfills her vision, the “PopUP Forest: Times Square” she has proposed will disappear three weeks after its sudden appearance, leaving behind the memory of a bizarre anomoly, effluents from the fuels combusted to realize it, the depleted forest that provided the temporary botanical specimens, and exorbitant bills (the cost is estimated at $1.7 million).

Anzelone promises that her project “will give visitors an immersive natural area experience in the most un-natural place on the planet. In the middle of the night, we’ll transform a public plaza in Times Square into a large-scale temporary nature installation. Towering trees, native wildflowers, and ferns underfoot will bring a piece of wilderness to the heart of Manhattan.

The hustle and bustle of Times Square will momentarily slip away with flowering shrubs, mosses, and understory vegetation providing beauty and important sustenance for migrating birds and pollinating insects. The cacophony of street noise will be quieted and replaced by a live stream of wildlife sounds from nearby woods. Visitors’ sensory experiences will be enhanced through guided woodland walks, interpretive signs, and hands-on educational activities for children. Then – after three weeks – it will all disappear. Reaching our goal of $25,000 will fund the critical first steps of this project. The Kickstarter funding will empower us with very basic design, marketing and outreach materials and a small-scale prototype to help us move toward securing the estimated $1.7 million cost of PopUP Forest.”

One gets the impression that Anzelone has cast the botanicals in the roles of aspiring starlets awaiting their debut on Broadway.

A few comments from me, a bewildered reader:

When Did the Anthropocene Epoch Begin?

The Smithosonian’s Museum of Natural History is mounting a massive exhibition exploring the “Anthropocene” era. It will remain on view until 2019. During the intervening years, the debate that is currently being conducted by the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international regarding its official inception may be settled.


Unlike the era, the origin of the debate can be traced back to the 1970s when Paul Crutzen, the atmospheric chemist, discovered a verifiable evidence that humanity had become so dominant on the globe, it was actually influencing planetary conditions. Crutzen linked the increase in human activities to the shrinking of the ozone layer.

As Richard Monastersky reports, as evidence has mounted, there is growing pressure to proclaim the Anthropocene as the official name for the current era, to follow the Holocene and the Pleistocene. But dates for its inception have not gained consensus. Indeed, they span 5,000 years!

 

Red-Earth-2

 

In their ritualized performances, the artists Red Earth evoke the conditions that prevailed during the Neolithic period, the earliest of the proposed dates. However, it seems the geologists chose this date because it initiated many of the technologies and procedures that are currently associated with dangerous environmental disruptions. The artists, in contrast, chose this date because it was a time of attunement between humans and the geological, astronomical, and biological forces of the Earth.

Here are the dates that are currently being considered:

Cultural Schizophrenia: Technological Progress vs Environmental Jeopardy

Contemporary humans may be indulging in the ultimate folly of our 40,000 plus years on Earth by promoting obsolescence in the midst of a global environmental crisis. Schizophrenia is the word that describes the compulsion to pursue short term ‘wants’ that can never be fulfilled, while we fret about long term ‘needs’ being met in the future. The latter will only be accomplished by restraining the former. Escaping this neurotic push-and-pull mentality requires adjusting our attitudes toward the digital culture we inhabit. Instead of associating it with speed and convience, we must focus on the endless heap of network wires, lines, routers, switches and other very material things that deplete resources and contaminate ecosystems when they are being manufactured, then produce a double jeopardy by re-contaminating ecosystems after they are discarded. The hazards persist whether the electronic devices are dumped into landfills, incinerated, or recycled.

Rushing to proclaim ‘obsolete’ regarding contemporary media technologies is providing future archeologists with a new kind of fossil because the components of digital media and their effects will linger far into the future.

Whereas electronic gadget manufacturers announce that ‘progress’ is inherent to quick turnovers, and teams of advertisers and marketers reinforce this message, environmentalists and concerned citizens are fretting about collapse. They know that laptops or mobile phones that promise to be better than previous versions, they will not hold this distinction for long because another update will soon be devised to replace them.

Thus, the temporalities of media objects anticipate the future of archaeology that is likely to disclose irrefutable evidence of today’s mistaken impression  that electronics constitute clean technology.

Chu Yun‘s installation, “Constellation”, suggests a scenario of exorbitant energy use, carbon emissions, heavy metal discards, chemical soaked chips, .