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“The Arc of Life: A Permaculture Homestead”

Mary Angeles, Chronogram, July 2016 Armstrong http://www.chronogram.com/hudsonvalley/the-arc-of-life/Content?oid=2373867

Climate Change: The Fatalism of Force Majeure?

A ‘force majeure’ refers to occurrences beyond the reasonable control of any human, such as a war, strike, riot, crime, hurricane, flood, earthquake, volcanic eruption, etc. It is the name of an ambitious body of work by Helen and Newton Harrison, and the title of a book that was just published.THE TIME of the FORCE MAJEURE: After 45 Years Counterforce is on the Horizon.

The Harrisons have added to the conventional examples of  ‘force majeures’ one that is unique to the current era – the pressure of human-generated climate warming on the Earth’s systems that are affected by rising temperatures, shrinking icepacks and changing in weather patterns – all of which are potentially catastrophic.

Newton explains why this force is major, “….the changes in the environment are both inevitable and happening. We have experienced at least 5 past mass extinctions related to environmental shock. Unless wefind effective ways to mitigate the impact of greenhouse gases and industrialization, the 6th mass extinction now in evidence will resist mediation.”

Artists Offer Three Views of ‘Science’: Fact, Speculation, Religion

Science as truth:

Hans Haacke’s demonstrated the scientific success of his art and ecology intervention in Rhinewater Purification Plant. The success of his experiment was evident in the clean basin filled with healthy goldfish. His innovative experiment relegated viewers to mere observers of a system that excluded their participation, their understanding, and their support. His mode of address manifested the factual and pedagogical authority that characterized one view of science. 

Science as speculation:

Natalie Jeremijenko disagrees.She objected to the authoritative stance of science and its inaccessibility to the public. Although Jeremijenko earned several advanced degrees in science, she switched careers in order to pursue her experiments within the category of art. She comments: ‘The artist’s view is invaluable precisely because artists are not experts and do not have the authority granted by science. They are only as persuasive as their images. As nonexperts—though interested and knowledgeable—they stand in for the view of Everyman. They transcend boundaries; they transcend disciplines, issues, and expertise. With art, the viewer knows that she has a license to interpret and critically evaluate the work and that her opinion matters. The same can’t be said of science. Scientific arguments are presented in the public imagination as faits accomplis. When definitive terms such as “discovered” and “understood” are the norm, science is often a one-way conversation.”[1]

Science as Religion:

Critical Art Ensemble not only concurs regarding the power of science; they identify this power with the power of a religion. “Science is the institution of authority regarding the production of knowledge, and tends to replace this particular social function of conventional Christianity in the west. In keeping with this position, science has slowly but surely become a key myth maker within society, thus defining for the general population the structure and dynamics of the cosmos and the origins and makings of life, or, in other words, defining nature itself. Much as religion once



[1] Viewer Discretion Advised. Review by Natalie Jeremijenko http://www.conservationmagazine.org/2010/05/viewer-discretion-advised/

 



[1] Viewer Discretion Advised. Review by Natalie Jeremijenko http://www.conservationmagazine.org/2010/05/viewer-discretion-advised/

 

Cosmological Grandeur of Tomas Saraceno’s Vision

By merging his art practice with physics, biology, cosmology, and engineering, Tomas Saraceno‘s visions may seem too grand to be contained within the confines of any museum. Furthermore, his dedication to constructing the principles upon which a utopian future can be orchestrated seems anachronistic to the time scales of museum exhibitions. In addition, museums seem ill-equipped to provide a suitable setting where the particular future he is constructing because it locates humans and all other forms of life beyond our planet; it situates us in the vast expanses of the cosmos. Nonetheless, an exhibition evoking the enormity of this vision is currently on view at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art where it will remain through May, 2017.

 

Installation view, Tomás Saraceno: Stillness in Motion—Cloud Cities, 2017

Down with the Anthropocene. Long live the Aerocene!

Never at a loss to discover new ways to disrupt social norms, Tomas Saraceno has announced an AEROCENE EXPLORER: BETA VERSION project. He describes the goal of the project, which is nothing less than challenging the Anthropocene and build a new epoch, the Aerocene.

The project proves that human exploration can proceed without fossil fuels, helium, rare gases, or batteries. It is:

Inflated by air,

Lifted by sunlight,

Carried by the wind.

Saraceno describes the project as “an open-source, Do-It-Together flying sculpture for solar-powered atmospheric exploration.” He has announced an “Open Call” in which he invites members of the public to “be in the first Aerocene Explorer MOVIE – Share a 1-minute video of your Aerocene experience”

The Aerocene Exploer movie is a collection of 1-minute videos documenting the xperiences of people around the world. Along with the instructions provided at    , participants are encouraged to ‘hack’ the device’s pack, and create their own sensors.

How Many Ways Are There to Define Eco Art? At Least 110,000!

Wikipedia definitions of Ecological art and Environmental art succeed in representing the vastness and diversity of these areas of artistic exploration. This success, however, is accompanied by a failure to make eco art activity manageable to readers seeking clarity. These definitions packed with references. The breadth and diversity they intentionally incorporate overwhelm rather than clarify.

Wikipedia definition of ecological art includes:

….preserve, remediate and/or vitalize

….life forms, resources and ecology of Earth,

….lithosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere

….wilderness, rural, suburban and urban

….restoration, socially engaged, activist, community-based.

               ….politics, culture, economics, ethics and aesthetics

….artists, scientists, philosophers and activists

 

Wikipedia definition of environmental art includes:

….historical and more recent

                ….ecological and politically motivated

                ….science and philosophy

               ….traditional media, new media and critical social forms of production

               ….rural to the suburban and urban as well as    urban/rural industrial.

In consideration of the reader’s preference for doling out these options at a pace that matches learning capacities rather than onslaughts,  the introduction to my eco art textblook, TO LIFE! Eco Art in Pursuit of a Sustainable Planet begins by identifying one issue: the differences between ‘ecology’ and ‘environmentalism’. It proceeds, chapter by chapter, to represent the multiplicity of creative options that the Wikipedia definitions include. My hope is that these definitions will become understandable by the time readers arrive at the last chapter.

Maya Lin Returns to Washington Triumphant

The behind-the-scenes story of Maya Lin‘s renowned Vietnam Memorial on the great Mall in Washington DC may surprise those who consider this work a moving testimonial to those who died in this pursuit. The response, at the time in 1982, was mixed. Those who celebrated the honor bestowed upon this young Asian artist were pitted against those who maligned the choice and its outcome. Maya Lin was caught in the fray, discredited because of her race, gender, and age.

Now, the dust has settled in favor of her supporters. This week she received The Presidential Medal of Freedom, the ultimate honor bestowed upon artists in this country. 

 

Haapoja Wins a Prestigious Award for Putting Humanity on Trial

Terike Haapoja wins the ANTI Festival International Prize for Live Art

Terike won the ANTI Festival International Prize for Live Art on 29th October. The Prize underlines the importance of live art and her significant contributions to this vanguard arena of contemporary artistic expression.

The chair of jury, Eva Neklyaeva, described Haapoja’s work: “At its heart her work is fascinated with how we perceive and apprehend and  – perhaps more importantly – how we are perceived; how does the non-human feel our human presence – the animal, the mineral, the light and the life of the world, what is the real nature and impact of our footprint, our mark, our own signs of life. We know this one of the fundamental questions, one of the fundamental problems, of our age.”

Terike Haapoja dares to challenge an entrenched social construction by stripping privileged humans of the power to parcel out the protections they demand for themselves. This lop-sided concentration of power has produced a civilization that supports brutal slaughter houses for animals, and mistreatment and genocide for un-empowered humans. Terika Haapoja is their self-declared spokewoman. Her latest art projets counter the anthropological institutions and attitudes that function like machines of targeted and willful abuse by declaring these’voiceless’ beings to attain the status of political entities. Besides cattle, she has reached out to humans who are categorized as “others”: convicts, asylum seekers, children, foreigners or the mentally challenged.

 

 Haapoja-The Trial

Her drive for structural changes to common decision-making procedures and institutions aspires to incorporates these mute members of the planet’s living populations a role in social decision-making processes.

To counter the violent logic of such political divisions, Haapoja created Party of Others in 2011. The “Statement of Principles” articulates the party’s platform. Significantly, it was formulated from a collection of interviews: “The Party of Others speaks for all those who don’t have a voice in social decision-making but who are nevertheless affected by the decisions: production animals, pets, wild animals, natural diversity as well as ecosystems such as rivers, swamps, mountains or forests.”

Haapoja launched the Party during Helsinki’s 2011 parliamentary elections, demanding inclusive representation and the values of social equality, diversity, and inter-species understanding. While the initiative raised much interest and garnered appreciable media coverage, it didn’t receive enough support to register the party officially, which required 5000 signatures. Perhaps she will try again in the future.

 

 

Fernando Garcia Dory Campaigns of Agro Reform in Korea

“Lament of the Newt” transferred FErnando Garcia Dory’s campaign for agrarian preservation from Spain to Korea. His contribution to the Gwangju Biennale from August to September 2016 consisted of collective performances staged on the last surviving rice field in Gwangju. Once a common site, rice fields are being steadily usurped to create space for towering apartment blocks.

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Rights of Nature: A Post-Anthropocentric Inevitability?

TREExOFFICE transforms the ‘Rights of Nature’ movement from a utopian desire to a functioning prototype. The artist, Natalie Jeremijenko, created this ‘co-working’ space in which the ‘co’ refers to two kinds of co-workers: human and trees. She equipped the space with all the requirements of a contemporary office (high speed internet) as well as the requirements of environmental conservations (locally generated renewable energy). The work elicits a parallel consideration regarding the tree. What inputs do trees need to function? How will these needs be converted into rights that are protected by law?

Tjeremijenko---tree-officehere are legal precedents for her action. In recent years,  rights granted to nonhuman entities have taken two forms. Corporations recently became the beneficiaries of a Supreme Court ruling that provides organizations the identical privileges as humans, and these rights are guaranteed by law. ‘Nature’ is gradually emerging as the other recipient of inherent ‘rights’. New Zealand, for example, granted an 821 square mile forest the legal rights and status of a person. Other legal precedents include the Bolivian Rights of Mother Earth document. and the larger contemporary Rights of Nature Movement.